Teaser post. Perspective of life

Recent events had made me re-evaluate my life. What we do now may or may not affect our health in the future. In this blog we are not fitness gurus, well ok my sister is, but I’m not. All I want for myself is to stay healthy as much as possible which will not only benefit me but also my family.20180127_1404301321145917.jpg

 

My mum was in the hospital recently (she will recover) and it made me think stuff. We don’t think these stuff until it happens. Hospitals suck big time and you have no idea when a crisis will hit you. We can’t avoid the future but we can help ourselves become better, healthier and at least minimize the chances of sicknesses that are related to our lifestyle choices.

Besides health there is another thing. Don’t wait on doing things. Just do it because you don’t know what is going to happen tomorrow and you don’t want to have regrets.

Like me, I want to get going with YouTube but I always postpone it. Because I’m shy. I’ll get over it. I must.

 

 

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9 comments

  1. I agree fully with your teaser post. Although I won’t be instituting this change just yet. I don’t know how much of my blog postings you read. But the day after Christmas 2016, I had a hemorrhagic stroke and could easily have died from it. Every day of my life was about hurrying through the day, so I could get it over with and go to bed. Then the next day, the same circus would start anew. Legally I’ve been forced from my career, so I find myself at home starting some new things, things which I certainly have plenty of time to commit to them. Among your topics however you discuss starting a YouTube channel. Yesterday, I changed my name on YouTube and on my blog to The Man Who Forgot Time. So now, like yourself I have only to get started when I can to create content and I can then spread out and begin my media empire. Of course I’m trying to do many things I’ve been working for one of the largest companies in the world for 20+ years now. So it’s time for me to do something for me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much for replying to my post. I started following you and read many of your posts – but not all – because around the same time as you my mum had an ischemic stroke (and many more unnoticed smaller ones in the past) so I want to read your experiences so that I can understand and help my mum as much as I can. Do you miss your previous profession or do you feel like fuck it, it’s my time now! In any case I wish you only the best for the future.

      Liked by 1 person

      • HI, it’s kind of difficult to explain my range of feelings about being a truck driver at UPS. Of course, over the years (Not as if I ever had reason to doubt it), I discovered just how good we had it. Of course, our high pay and benefits came with a tradeoff that no one wants to make. You essentially trade your personal life for one of money and benefits. Yes, we do get plenty of vacation and days off too. But on the days you go to work, you are at work. You will be away from home and from the ability to see to the little details of your personal life and that’s just how it is. I do miss being a truck driver, not because driving one of those rigs is fun. It isn’t really fun at all. When you do make some maneuver that you hoped to be able to pull off(this maneuver could be any type), it makes you proud of yourself and gives you more confidence in your abilities. I recall when I was a teenager and in my younger 20’s, I used to drive my personal cars very fast and very well. I have little doubt I could have been a professional race driver if I’d had a supporter and took my own initiative to develop a career there. But anyway, over the years, I slowed down, drove more carefully and wisely. But for some reason, once I started driving tractor trailers, I began to combine my natural abilities driving a car quickly and precisely with getting a job done. This would reference my one blog where I tell that I was a safe terror on the Interstates. I just could not stand to be passed by a faster truck than mine. Keep in mind that most tractors in the U.S., have their speed controlled from the engine management computer to keep you from doing let’s say, 100mph. Our ‘mileage’ tractors (trucks that were driven on mileage paying runs), usually topped out around 73 or sometimes a wee bit faster. And I always tried to maximize my speed most of the trip. The most enjoyable part of this job was not only the respect we had but that we made lots of money for doing so. Most of these poor sobs you meet on the roadways, live out of their trucks, eat like crap, get no exercise other than sleeping with the occasional prostitute. And they are not treated well in any way by their employer. Here in the U.S. these drivers are often schemed into financing a ‘new’ truck through their corporation to make their lives so wonderful. But then, they have to drive almost 24/7 just to survive, financially. They don’t get home for weeks at a time (if they even have a home). Their life by our standards just sucks. They miss everything in their own life. So in comparison, we had it great. I used to whine to my wife (like us tough guys do) that I needed to quit my job and jokingly tell her I’d become a hairdresser or whatever because my job was killing me slowly. All the while, I wouldn’t unnecessarily miss a day of work. But after surviving my own stroke(s), I have zero choices about quitting. Yes, UPS would keep me on. I could hold some management position or maybe load trucks (start from scratch), but I won’t put my joints through all of that again. It takes about the same mental toughness it takes to become a Navy Seal to get to where I got to. Why would I repeat that when I can’t even drive? Anything specifically I can help you with, I gladly will. It is difficult enough to explain to my wife what I feel like, but I do try. So anytime you have questions with which I can answer questions, I gladly will. It won’t be long until my blogs (and YouTube channel gets into other things like woodworking, politics, Cryptocurrency and who knows what else). But I am always a stroke survivor who has almost nearly achieved a complete recovery. If there is such a thing. I’m here.

        Like

      • I know I already responded to this discussion previously. But if you’ve seen any of my posts in recent weeks, you can see I’m already expanding beyond what it is to be a stroke survivor. So it is because of these things I mentioned I hope to help before I forget details I experienced along the way to my recovery. My primary message to any ‘too young for stroke’ survivors is don’t give up the fight to get back to ‘you’. You can get there.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. HI, it’s kind of difficult to explain my range of feelings about being a truck driver at UPS. Of course, over the years (Not as if I ever had reason to doubt it), I discovered just how good we had it. Of course, our high pay and benefits came with a tradeoff that no one wants to make. You essentially trade your personal life for one of money and benefits. Yes, we do get plenty of vacation and days off too. But on the days you go to work, you are at work. You will be away from home and from the ability to see to the little details of your personal life and that’s just how it is. I do miss being a truck driver, not because driving one of those rigs is fun. It isn’t really fun at all. When you do make some maneuver that you hoped to be able to pull off(this maneuver could be any type), it makes you proud of yourself and gives you more confidence in your abilities. I recall when I was a teenager and in my younger 20’s, I used to drive my personal cars very fast and very well. I have little doubt I could have been a professional race driver if I’d had a supporter and took my own initiative to develop a career there. But anyway, over the years, I slowed down, drove more carefully and wisely. But for some reason, once I started driving tractor trailers, I began to combine my natural abilities driving a car quickly and precisely with getting a job done. This would reference my one blog where I tell that I was a safe terror on the Interstates. I just could not stand to be passed by a faster truck than mine. Keep in mind that most tractors in the U.S., have their speed controlled from the engine management computer to keep you from doing let’s say, 100mph. Our ‘mileage’ tractors (trucks that were driven on mileage paying runs), usually topped out around 73 or sometimes a wee bit faster. And I always tried to maximize my speed most of the trip. The most enjoyable part of this job was not only the respect we had but that we made lots of money for doing so. Most of these poor sobs you meet on the roadways, live out of their trucks, eat like crap, get no exercise other than sleeping with the occasional prostitute. And they are not treated well in any way by their employer. Here in the U.S. these drivers are often schemed into financing a ‘new’ truck through their corporation to make their lives so wonderful. But then, they have to drive almost 24/7 just to survive, financially. They don’t get home for weeks at a time (if they even have a home). Their life by our standards just sucks. They miss everything in their own life. So in comparison, we had it great. I used to whine to my wife (like us tough guys do) that I needed to quit my job and jokingly tell her I’d become a hairdresser or whatever because my job was killing me slowly. All the while, I wouldn’t unnecessarily miss a day of work. But after surviving my own stroke(s), I have zero choices about quitting. Yes, UPS would keep me on. I could hold some management position or maybe load trucks (start from scratch), but I won’t put my joints through all of that again. It takes about the same mental toughness it takes to become a Navy Seal to get to where I got to. Why would I repeat that when I can’t even drive? Anything specifically I can help you with, I gladly will. It is difficult enough to explain to my wife what I feel like, but I do try. So anytime you have questions with which I can answer questions, I gladly will. It won’t be long until my blogs (and YouTube channel gets into other things like woodworking, politics, Cryptocurrency and who knows what else). But I am always a stroke survivor who has almost nearly achieved a complete recovery. If there is such a thing. I’m here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I get why you have mixed feelings. I see often truck drivers and I don’t think many would talk about their job like you do. I honestly wish you all the best and I’ll contact you if I ever have questions. On a different note when it comes to youtube, social media etc, not that you need it, but I recommend listening to Gary Vaynerchuck. He is great and a constant source of inspiration.

      Like

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